123Macmini.com
FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   GalleryPhoto Gallery   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Core Solo vs Core Duo for HTPC

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    123Macmini.com - Forums Forum Index -> Mac Mini HTPC
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
xl
New Member
New Member


Joined: 13 Mar 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2006 12:01 pm    Post subject: Core Solo vs Core Duo for HTPC Reply with quote

I apologize in advance if this question has already been asked, but I didn't see it in the forums. I will be using a mini strictly for an HTPC. Is there a big difference between the Solo and Duo for this purpose. I saw the benchmarks comparing the two, but it didn't mean much to me. Your opinions please.

Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ShaneHale
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 366
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:19 pm    Post subject: Re: Core Solo vs Core Duo for HTPC Reply with quote

xl wrote:
I apologize in advance if this question has already been asked, but I didn't see it in the forums. I will be using a mini strictly for an HTPC. Is there a big difference between the Solo and Duo for this purpose. I saw the benchmarks comparing the two, but it didn't mean much to me. Your opinions please.
Thanks


I think the main difference between the two is what resolution you want to run. The Duo will run 1080p HD Movies with no problem (w/ 1GB RAM) while the Solo will run 720p HD Movies with no problem, but will choke on the higher 1080p stuff. Other then RAM and Processing power the machines are quite simular.

If you are going to be ripping dvd's or music or burning discs you may want to look at the duo for the extra processing power and DVD-Burner.

I'm going with a solo for my HTPC. Its been a few weeks and I have been impressed with the results. I will upgrade the processesor at a later date so I may run 1080p.

Thanks my $.02...

shane
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
camination
Member
Member


Joined: 22 Feb 2006
Posts: 82

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

what does the extra 512MB of Ram do for the CoreDuo . . . reason i'm asking is because I have a CoreDuo with 512MB ram . . .
_________________
iMac Fans Unite

Agloco got me too . . . damn John Chow!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Bandit Bill
Veteran Member
Veteran Member


Joined: 07 Jun 2005
Posts: 5963
Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 7:18 pm    Post subject: Re: Core Solo vs Core Duo for HTPC Reply with quote

ShaneHale wrote:

I think the main difference between the two is what resolution you want to run. The Duo will run 1080p HD Movies with no problem (w/ 1GB RAM) while the Solo will run 720p HD Movies with no problem, but will choke on the higher 1080p stuff.


Where did you get this info? I would be very interested in reading up on this.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ShaneHale
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 366
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 7:38 pm    Post subject: Re: Core Solo vs Core Duo for HTPC Reply with quote

Bandit Bill wrote:


Where did you get this info? I would be very interested in reading up on this.


Bill,

I first read the article on MacDailyNews regarding the Duo. http://macdailynews.com/index.php/weblog/comments/reader_report_1080p_24fps_playback_on_mac_mini_core_duo_plays_fine/

The tests on the Solo I did myself....using the same trailers the user on MacDailyNew utilized. Because the 1080p trailers dropped frames on my solo. (13-18 fps on fast scenes) I downloaded the 720p trailers and repeated the test, and was consistently above 23.9 fps.

If you have any other specific questions I will happily address them.

Shane
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
Bandit Bill
Veteran Member
Veteran Member


Joined: 07 Jun 2005
Posts: 5963
Location: Edmonton, AB, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So the Mac mini Duo can play 1080p at 24 fps. That's pretty cool. The reviews say it was really working hard to do it. It would suck if the fan was going full blast and if the mini lived a short life because of this.

This is good news for most people. However, not too many mini owners have a 23" Cinema Display or a monitor capable of 1080p. I don't know anyone with a TV capable of 1080p, but I know they are coming down in $.

From what I understand 30fps is really what you'd like to see.
My question would be how many DVD players are capable of 1080p at 30fps and how much $ are they? Are they silent?

Were the videos on the mini playing 24fps off of the hard drive or the DVD drive or does that even matter?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
curt
Veteran Member
Veteran Member


Joined: 17 Mar 2005
Posts: 1445
Location: Oregon

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The 1080p movie trailers on Apple's website play great on my Core Duo. I can't speak for the Core Solo, but playing a bunch of them back to back deosn't cause my fan on mine to run any more than normal.
_________________
My Setup
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ShaneHale
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 366
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2006 2:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Typically 24 fps is what movies, tv shows and other films shoot for. The 30fps is generally what video games shoot for. While playing the 720p HD movies, I was playing them from my internal drive. The internal drive's access speed is slower then my external but I never perceived a noticable difference.

Typical DVD player today don't handle HD content at a native 1080p. There are a few players (LG comes to mind) that now have HD upconversion. Where HD quality is emulated by the DVD player to give you a better picture. But its really not what it seems... Current DVD's are interlaced images, while HD is progressive scan images.

For comparison:
- 1080p :: 1920 x 1080
- 720p :: 1280 x 720 <- this is what ABC HD and ESPN HD broadcast in
- 480i NTSC DVD :: 720 × 480
- 576i PAL DVD :: 720 × 576.

Real quick... the p or progressive scan is a higher quality image then a interlace scan. ie. 1080i is about 720p.

Now these upconverting DVD players take the 480i, de-interlace it to about 480p then scale to the desired resolution (ie. 720p or 1080p) All DVD's are 480i right now. The images will have a lot better quality then a standard V, but your still not getting true 1080p or 720p quality. Apple's DVD players upconvert from what i understand.

You will need to wait for a true HD DVD player and HD discs before you will get a true HD Image from them. The upconverting DVD players go for $200-$400 right now, but why spend the $ when Apple's DVD player already handle it.

"Proponents of 720p further argue that at the average viewing distance, with the average size of consumer HDTV sets, the human eye would not actually be able to perceive the difference in resolution between 720p and 1080i. This is because the 720p image "saturates" the perceivable resolution of the eye at this distance—watching from much closer to the monitor, however, the viewer would be able to see the difference."

Hope this helps you decide and not confuse ya.
Shane
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
camination
Member
Member


Joined: 22 Feb 2006
Posts: 82

PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2006 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

so what does the ram have to do with the video output?
_________________
iMac Fans Unite

Agloco got me too . . . damn John Chow!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
dtsfanohio
New Member
New Member


Joined: 18 Mar 2006
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2006 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ShaneHale wrote:
Typically 24 fps is what movies, tv shows and other films shoot for. The 30fps is generally what video games shoot for. While playing the 720p HD movies, I was playing them from my internal drive. The internal drive's access speed is slower then my external but I never perceived a noticable difference.

Typical DVD player today don't handle HD content at a native 1080p. There are a few players (LG comes to mind) that now have HD upconversion. Where HD quality is emulated by the DVD player to give you a better picture. But its really not what it seems... Current DVD's are interlaced images, while HD is progressive scan images.

For comparison:
- 1080p :: 1920 x 1080
- 720p :: 1280 x 720 <- this is what ABC HD and ESPN HD broadcast in
- 480i NTSC DVD :: 720 × 480
- 576i PAL DVD :: 720 × 576.

Real quick... the p or progressive scan is a higher quality image then a interlace scan. ie. 1080i is about 720p.

Now these upconverting DVD players take the 480i, de-interlace it to about 480p then scale to the desired resolution (ie. 720p or 1080p) All DVD's are 480i right now. The images will have a lot better quality then a standard V, but your still not getting true 1080p or 720p quality. Apple's DVD players upconvert from what i understand.

You will need to wait for a true HD DVD player and HD discs before you will get a true HD Image from them. The upconverting DVD players go for $200-$400 right now, but why spend the $ when Apple's DVD player already handle it.

"Proponents of 720p further argue that at the average viewing distance, with the average size of consumer HDTV sets, the human eye would not actually be able to perceive the difference in resolution between 720p and 1080i. This is because the 720p image "saturates" the perceivable resolution of the eye at this distance—watching from much closer to the monitor, however, the viewer would be able to see the difference."

Hope this helps you decide and not confuse ya.
Shane


Shane,

Just to confirm... the Apple DVD player software on the Min- Mac Core Duo upconverts to 480p, 720pm and 1080i like an Oppo DVD player thus no need for an Oppo?? Is this correct?

Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ShaneHale
Senior Member
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 366
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I believe it was DVD Player 4.6 which added HD support. This will allow your DVD player to play BluRay DVD's. From my understanding Apple's DVD player was the first to include this as an option, and they have supported blu-ray adoption for a while now.

Because most (non-hd) dvds are encoded for 480i (720x480), Apple DVD player scales this (read upconvert) to 720 or 1080. And from my understanding this is the same method upconverting DVD players utilize.

Check you preference panel in DVD player for these preferences.

My view is... why go out and spend $200-$300 right now on a upconverting DVD while my mini handles it already, and will handle blu-ray DVD's when they are out. Mind you that BluRay DVD and HD-DVD players will be priced around $1k once available.

..shane

Edit: link: http://www.hdbeat.com/2006/03/03/apples-dvd-player-hd-ready/
_________________
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger MSN Messenger
dtsfanohio
New Member
New Member


Joined: 18 Mar 2006
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ShaneHale wrote:
I believe it was DVD Player 4.6 which added HD support. This will allow your DVD player to play BluRay DVD's. From my understanding Apple's DVD player was the first to include this as an option, and they have supported blu-ray adoption for a while now.

Because most (non-hd) dvds are encoded for 480i (720x480), Apple DVD player scales this (read upconvert) to 720 or 1080. And from my understanding this is the same method upconverting DVD players utilize.

Check you preference panel in DVD player for these preferences.

My view is... why go out and spend $200-$300 right now on a upconverting DVD while my mini handles it already, and will handle blu-ray DVD's when they are out. Mind you that BluRay DVD and HD-DVD players will be priced around $1k once available.

..shane

Edit: link: http://www.hdbeat.com/2006/03/03/apples-dvd-player-hd-ready/


I agree... thats why I wanted to confirm what you were saying but it looks like the preferences are for "burned" DVDs in HD not upscaling of DVDs like an Oppo player, Am I wrong? Thanks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    123Macmini.com - Forums Forum Index -> Mac Mini HTPC All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum



      

Shop:  Apple Store  |  Refurbished Macs  |  Refurbished iPads  |  MacConnection  |  Mac Mini Vault  |  Other World Computing

MK 1 Studio Mac mini Racks  |  Crucial Mac Memory  |  Top Free Mac Apps  |  Top Paid Mac Apps



123Macmini.com is an independent publication and has not been authorized, sponsored, or approved by Apple Computer, Inc.
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owners.
Copyright © 2011 123Macmini.com. All Rights Reserved.