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File Formating Help Needed

 
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Smallwheels
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 11:58 am    Post subject: File Formating Help Needed Reply with quote

I've written about this in a different post but not with this same purpose. I have decided to move all of the files on my Mac Book to an external hard drive. I'm doing this because I eventually will be selling it. What I want to do is make the files readable and capable of being modified in Linux or Windows.

In a different post I mentioned that I could move files to my external hard drive but once there I couldn't modify them. I could open them with Linux and even Vista, because I have Macdrive which allows such files to be read by Windows. What I couldn't do was change anything in the files. It was explained to me that OSX does journaling which has something to do with arranging things on the drive. This is because of the file system Macs use.

Is there a way for me to take all of the files on the entire machine and change them to a different system that can be read and modified on Windows and Linux, and then migrate them to an external hard drive? Of course I don't want to do this one file at a time with about 70 GB of files. That would take a week.

I just want to be able to use the files as I normally would in other systems. If I recall properly, once I change the format the Mac will take much longer to find things on the drive. This won't matter once I move everything to an external drive. Then I can change the system to its original configuration before selling the machine.

My preference would be to make these files useable in Ubuntu or Open SUSE. If there is a format that both Linux and Windows can use then that would probably be optimum.

Maybe this can be done with some other method. If so please enlighten me. Learning about new things is always good in my opinion.

Thank you.
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Smithcraft
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the files are under 2 GB, then you could back up the drive, reformat it to FAT32 and then copy everything back. If you have files over 2 GB then it gets tricky, and you can either use NTFS and a third party NTFS driver for OS X and Linux. Or EXT4 or something like that with a third party driver for OS X and Windows.

SC
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Smallwheels
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I doubt I have individual files over 2 GB but I know I have folders that are big. Those contain videos. I could probably divide each of them into folders smaller than 2 GB.

So if I reformat the Mac Book drive after off loading the files, will I have to reload all of the programs and everything? Is this like wiping the drive?

If I purchase an external drive specifically for this purpose what should be it's format? What I'm missing is where in this process will the existing files be converted to a new format?

My existing backup drive uses Carbon Copy Cloner. I'm sure it is already formatted the same as the Mac Book. How would I check that? If I just divided up my large folders into smaller sub 2 GB chunks would that be good enough using the Carbon Copy Cloner?
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Smithcraft
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 3:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think it matters if a folder is over 2 GB, it's just the individual files can't be over 2 GB.

If you reformat a drive, you are erasing it. If you purchase an external drive it will most likely either be formatted with NTFS or HFS. You can use Disk Utility to format it to HFS, or FAT. I don't know if it will do FAT32.

When I picked up a 3 TB drive for a friend, there were all sorts of issues that some OSs might have with a drive over 2 TB, so I would recommend that you get a drive that is not bigger than 2 TB.

The drive format is like a printed sheet of paper. My paper is rectangular, and vertically oriented, with no weirdness. Your paper might be square with the corners cut off al a BSG. If I put your documents in my copier, now they are on my paper. So if you copy the files to the new drive, they will be on that format. I don't see any need to worry about any sort of conversion.

Or you could get a NAS type device which handles all that stuff and is always there for any computer on your network. Something simple like a Western Digital MyBook Live might be all you need, and you don't have to worry about formats.

If you want to see what format a drive, that is connected to your Mac, has you can just Get Info on that drive and it will tell you what the format is. Doing this in Windows is a slightly obnoxious pain in the rear.

SC
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[Desktop] Intel mini - 2.16Ghz 2GB 60GB HDD - Newer miniStack v2 500GB - 10.5.8

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macmanmacman
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2013 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would recommend a nas setup indeed it works better because on several nas drives you can have two drives in the case one in mac os x and one in fat 32 of which both windows and linux and macintosh read
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iMav
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 5:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

macmanmacman wrote:
I would recommend a nas setup indeed it works better because on several nas drives you can have two drives in the case one in mac os x and one in fat 32 of which both windows and linux and macintosh read

Actually, no. The local file system type on a NAS is irrevelent (as it is not directly accessed by your computers). Your computers will access the NAS via whatever network file system(s) they support (NFS, SMB, AFP, SFTP, etc).
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Smallwheels
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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 12:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm moving to a new place this week and want to get this file storage thing done. I bought a Toshiba 1 TB drive. It is formatted in NTFS. It says it comes with drivers for the Mac. It hasn't been connected yet.

If I just connect it to the Mac and move the files without using their special driver, will the saved files be readable and writable in Linux and Windows? I want to put the files from three computers onto this drive, all on the same partition. The totality of the hard drives of the three units is only 520 GB. I believe the amount of data stored on all of them would equal only 230 GB.

One machine is Windows XP SP2; one is Ubuntu 10.04 and Vista, and the last one is OSX 10.5.8. Once the XP files are saved successfully I will erase all of the files on that machine and perhaps never turn it on again.

I will mostly use the dual boot HP with a variant of Linux and just keep Vista for Netflix. As long as I can move the 80 GB of files that are on the Mac Book and make them editable using Linux I'll be fine. My files on Vista are mostly images and a couple of movies. Some documents are there but I don't need to modify them.

I'll continue to let Time Machine be my primary backup unit using my 500 GB G-Tech drive. With all of my legacy files from the XP machine kept on the Toshiba drive I'll be able to dedicate the entire G-Tech drive for Time Machine. Right now I have a Windows Partition on the G-Tech drive.
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Smallwheels
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2013 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you all for your information. By using the NTFS format I have successfully gotten important files to the external hard drive. Those files are readable and writeable on the Linux OSs. I tried to open Vista to check but it just crashed. Being thoroughly frustrated with Vista I finally wiped it from my HP machine never to be used again. I wish I could collect a million tons of crap and dump it on the Microsoft campus buildings. That is how much I hate them for selling Vista. I feel relieved.
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