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Ubuntu 11.04 "Natty Narwhal"

 
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The Pontificator
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2011 11:13 pm    Post subject: Ubuntu 11.04 "Natty Narwhal" Reply with quote

Just downloaded it and installed it on a flash drive. I've decided to give Linpus Light (Acer Aspire One) the boot.
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Fox
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Installing Natty on my MSI Wind netbook as I write this. I want to examine energy consumption before deciding whether to replace 10.10, as there was a recent article suggesting that the 2.6.38 kernel consumes a lot more energy than the 2.6.35 kernel used in 10.10. I want to keep battery time as high as possible.
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The Pontificator
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2011 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm getting the idea that Linux OS's work better on Windows netbooks than they do on the old SSD netbooks specifically designed around a hacked, locked down Linux distro such as the 1st generation Acer Aspire One (Linpus Light) and ASUS EEEPC's (Andros?)
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Fox
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You certainly get more flexibility with non-locked down distros; you can more easily configure them to suit your taste. Also, there are lightweight distros out there that probably run much faster than Linpus on limited hardware. These would include Bodhi Linux (a Ubuntu-based distro running the Enlightenment window manager) and CrunchBang Linux (a Debian-based distro running openbox or xfce. But to be honest, I've never run Linpus myself.
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The Pontificator
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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fox wrote:
You certainly get more flexibility with non-locked down distros; you can more easily configure them to suit your taste. Also, there are lightweight distros out there that probably run much faster than Linpus on limited hardware. These would include Bodhi Linux (a Ubuntu-based distro running the Enlightenment window manager) and CrunchBang Linux (a Debian-based distro running openbox or xfce. But to be honest, I've never run Linpus myself.


Linpus Lite was a horrible, horrible product and it's a shame they just didn't go ahead and install Fedora or Ubuntu NBR on those first netbooks.


I tried Bodhi in the Netbook/tablet environment and didn't like it. I decided to give it a second chance and this time ran it "live" from the "laptop" environment. MUCH BETTER.

While not a "beginners" Linux distro, Bodhi has a lot of cool stuff mainly it's FAST FAST FAST FAST FAST and it would be excellent for resurrecting a very old computer as it needs very few resources to run.

Bodhi is definitely worth a look.
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Fox
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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 5:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What you probably didn't like in Bodhi the first time is the "Netbook" supertheme. I didn't like it either. But even after installing it, you can change it to one of the other superthemes. I can't remember whether I chose the "Notebook" or "Desktop" supertheme, but I quite like it and find that it works well on my netbook. I use it about 50:50 with Ubuntu.
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The Pontificator
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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fox wrote:
What you probably didn't like in Bodhi the first time is the "Netbook" supertheme. I didn't like it either.


Yes, that is correct. The "netbook" theme. That, and the file manager wouldn't work the second time I accessed it.

I guess there's a cure for that:

sudo apt-get install update



Very Happy
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CaliforniaMini
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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To fellow Mac users, I've got to ask why? Perhaps there is something I'm missing. I do most of what I want and need to do in OSX. Occasionally something will come along that OSX can't handle (like my computer based math classes) and I boot into Windows. I tried Ubuntu on my netbook a while ago. I admit I didn't give it much of a chance, but I didn't see any purpose for it. Between OSX 95% of the time and Windows the other 5%, I really don't see a need for anything else.

I realize its personal preference, but what does Ubuntu offer that OSX and Windows don't?
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Fox
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 6:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is a longish answer to your question.

I wouldn't say you are missing anything, but there are things about Linux in general that appeal to me and will appeal to other Mac (and PC) users. The two things that got me interested initially both relate to control and choice:

- Linux can be installed on a Mac, but it doesn't require one, allowing me to buy the computer I am most happy with.

- I can easily configure many aspects of the operating system, including the look and feel of the desktop, level of security, etc.

- With Linux in general, I have a lot of choice as to which version (distribution) I want to use.

You may say that Apple makes the best computers, and I agree with you overall (and have voted with my feet, so to speak). But I and many other Mac users have been upset for years about not being able to choose an easily upgradable low to mid-size computer. The mini itself and the iMac are very good examples of this. They are both excellently designed computers, but both offer major challenges to anyone who wants to be able to upgrade the hardware within their computer. In my case, I own two minis, but I also still own an old G4 Cube, which is much more upgradable. (I am typing on it now.) I recently bought a "new" mini, but went with the 2009 model rather than the current one because it is much more difficult to upgrade anything but the RAM in it. But the Cube is much easier (I have upgraded RAM, CPU and video card in it). Why can't Apple make a slightly larger mini with a 3.5" drive and upgradable RAM, HD, video card and CPU? Because they choose not to, and because they have a monopoly on the OS, I have no choice.

I use Apple systems most of the time, and the majority of my computers (home and office) are Macs. But I wanted a light, portable netbook for light duty computing, which I can do work on if necessary, but I mainly use it for email and internet. The 11.6" Macbook Air would have fit the purpose, but I wasn't willing to spend that kind of money for a light duty computer and the iPad didn't exist at the time. I ended up spending $450 for an Acer that has almost identical specs to the MBA, and the silver "special Olympic edition" looks almost as nice in my opinion. It came with a standard hard drive. I wanted to try an SSD in it. No problem - I bought a 60 ghz model and installed it in 10 minutes. But the MBA comes with an SSD, you say. Yes, but later I wanted a bigger SSD; for $150 I got a 120 gb SSD and 10 minutes later it's in my netbook. Try that on an MBA.

I run Ubuntu on my netbook. I can start it from off to a working internet connection in less than 20 sec. I get 6+ hours' battery life. I can and have configured it so that it's appearance is to my liking and I can totally change the look and feel when I get tired of its present state. I improved my battery life by picking up scripts on the internet (I'm no programmer!) and inserting them into the guts of my operating system files.

Ubuntu recently made a change in their current version that makes it more icon (and touch driven if you have the right hardware); yes in advance of Mac OSX Lion. I don't like many things about the new interface, but I can find modifications that make it to my liking, are open source (and therefore free), and are easy to implement. If I still didn't like it, I could choose to use a different Linux distribution, and all my (free) applications would work on it, so any files I have made will work on it.

Think this issue isn't relevant to Mac users? Read some of the posts on Macintouch from long time Mac users upset that Rosetta will no longer be supported in Lion. I can relate - I still have a statistical program that runs only in MacOS 9 or below; accessible through an OS9 emulation program that can be run on Snow Leopard, but won't operate on Lion. I have to keep old Macs around for things like this, but this is not a good solution for businesses that depend on both old and new software.

The bottom line is that Linux gives one a lot of choice, both hardware and software choice. This may not matter to you but it does to me. And yes I still use Macs and the MacOS 90% of the time. That's because I'm already heavily invested in it professionally, and I haven't got the time (or the will at this point) to change over. But if I was starting over again, I would do it all on Linux or some open source version of unix (e.g., BSD).
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CaliforniaMini
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're right Fox, that was a long answer. Thanks! Honestly, I could see it appealing to Windows user more than Mac users, but thats just my opinion. I have an Compaq (HP) Mini that I picked up new for less than $10 (thats a whole other story) running OSX. I tried Ubuntu on it a while ago, and I just saw no need for it. Yes, it is very customizable and is a nice interface and not a battery hog. But for me, it would be more work than its worth for something I don't really think I need. But thats just my opinion.

This whole thought process came about because I am planning to change out the drive to a larger one in my Macbook soon. With the added space, I was thinking to myself I could triple-boot. But then I thought to myself 'why?' Yes, it is nice, but just not something I think I'd ever need. Looking around in other places and your response here just confirmed this for me.

Thanks!!!
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For what it's worth, I don't even double boot my MBP. I have Windows and Linux on virtual machines and that's good enough for occasional use. But on my MBP, I only play with Linux; when I take a Mac I use the MacOS except for the occasional Windows program I need for work.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've had my Mini since '05 and wanted to dual boot it with OS X and Linux, but never got around to doing it. I felt, being a die hard linux fan, I woulda kept using Linux the most. I did want to use and learn OS X more.
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