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Question about Ethernet

 
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gdog
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 6:46 pm    Post subject: Question about Ethernet Reply with quote

i am confused regarding ethernet, wireless router upload and download speeds. i have a gig ethernet mac (24 inch imac) 10/100/1000 base. the router is 10/100 base. the cables are cat 5. so because of cables router etc the fastest internet transfer is 100 not 1 gig correct ?? my internet service is 15000/2000. so 2nd question is 100 base router etc the bottleneck or is it the internet service? my actual speeds are 15 Mbps or 15331 kbps. what does this mean ??? wireless is 54 mbps. how do these numbers all add up ???
is wireless at 54 mean i can have like 3-4 macs going at 15 Mbps at the same time?? is 100 base 2 times faster than wireless? i don't know how to interpret all these different units.

one more question is cable or dsl different in speed ie is 15000/2000 cable the same as 15000/2000 dsl.
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Pleiades
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2007 12:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It certainly is confusing, because there's lots of different units of measurement, depending on what you're talking about. There also isn't any established standards for unit abbreviation, so that can add to confusion. Let me see if I can clear them up. I'll try to convert each transfer speed to the same unit, so we can compare apples to apples (for lack of a better term Smile. All of these speeds will be "per second" speeds, but I won't type out "per second" or "ps" each time, because we'd be here all day.

First off, your iMac. It has a 10/100/1000baseT ethernet port on it. It means it can connect to a 10 megabit (per second), 100 megabit, or 1000 megabit to a wired ethernet (base), twisted pair (T) cable. 1000 megabits is also called gigabit ethernet, because 1000 megabits equals 1 gigabit.

Since your router only supports 100mbits (meaning 100 megabits), your iMac will communicate to it at 100mbits.

Your internet service is rated at 15000/2000. That means it can transfer 15000 kilobits per second downstream (meaning incoming to you) and 2000 kilobits per second upstream (meaning outgoing from you). Converting 15000 kilobits in to megabits means dividing by 1000, so your downstream (or incoming) speed is 15mbits and your upstream (or outgoing) is 2mbit.

Clearly your router and iMac are both operating at speeds well above your internet speeds (100mbit on the router, 100mbit on the iMac and 15mbit downstream, 2mbit upstream for your internet connection), so there is no bottleneck there.

Wireless speeds should also be calculated. 802.11G networking (also called Airport Extreme by Apple) is rated at 54mbit maximum. That again is more than enough to cover the 15mbit your internet service offers. However, the exception with wireless networking is that speed decreases depending on how far away you are from the base station, and the ambient radio signals in the environment. Typical speeds for 802.11G networks are in the 20mbit range, so that is certainly close to your 15mbit internet service speeds, but still slightly above.

Now, your situation. I assume by you stating your actual speeds are 15331kbps, you've tested your internet speeds on one of the speed test sites. Dividing 15331kbps by 1000 means you're getting 15.3mbit service. Sounds like your internet service is fulfilling their advertised service, and your computer isn't hitting any bottlenecks from the various networking components in your home.

Yes, if a cable internet service and a dsl service were both advertised as "15000/2000" then they would probably be the same speed. Chances are they're both advertising 15000kbit downstream/2000kbit upstream. Regardless of the method of internet service, it's all just binary computer data, i.e. bits.

Digest all this, and see if I can answer more questions for you Smile
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gdog
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2007 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

that was an excellent explanation. thanks Twisted Evil
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24 inch core 2 duo, 2.33ghz, 2 gig ram
1 terabyte total ext. hard drive
fios 15000/2000 internet
macbook 2 ghz, 2 gig ram
i got 99 problems but a bitch aint one
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