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Dangers of Cloud Computing

 
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MacDSmith2
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 10:06 pm    Post subject: Dangers of Cloud Computing Reply with quote

Apple does not use the cloud computing model, but rather stores data and apps on the user's iPhone and personal computers. This prevents what happened with Sidekick and T-Mobile from happining to the iPhone:

Posted tonight on Apple Insider:

"Microsoft's high profile outage has impacted users in the worst possible way: the company has unrecoverable lost nearly all of its users' data, and now has no alternative backup plan for recovering any of it a week later. The outage and data loss affects all SideKick customers of the Danger group Microsoft purchased in early 2008."

"...while outages in the cloud computing world are common (one need only look at recent issues with Twitter or Gmail), data losses are another story. And this one stands as one of the more stunning ones in recent memory."
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g5g5
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The cloud should not be the primary place where data is stored or backed up. You really need to have a mix of local and cloud. That's just my opinion.
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Chris..S
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

g5g5, its not that it shouldn't be the primary. Primary is fine. Its just that it shouldn't be only.

Everything can and probably will fail. The goal of any backup strategy is to reduce the risks of data loss associated with any failure. So just like your disk could break, your iphone could be stolen, so could your cloud storage vendor lose your data. As long as your cloud storage doesn't go gaga at the same time as your iphone is stolen, you're ok. Just back things up a fresh once it comes back (or somewhere else).

It seems to me one issue people are increasingly confusing, is archive and backup. E.g. Time Machine is more an archive than a backup (although it does backup the current state of a machine). If you archive an old version of a particular file somewhere, its not backed up - at least not unless you are backing up your archive.
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g5g5
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agreed Chris. That was a poor choice of words. I really should have used the word only instead of primary. I would never trust everything on either one alone. I keep like four copies of our important stuff. The file will reside on the primary drive, an external drive, a burnt CD/DVD in a home safe, and then backed up to Mozy for offsite.
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Harryc56
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chris..S wrote:
... It seems to me one issue people are increasingly confusing, is archive and backup. E.g. Time Machine is more an archive than a backup (although it does backup the current state of a machine). If you archive an old version of a particular file somewhere, its not backed up - at least not unless you are backing up your archive.

As a time machine user your comment has me concerned. I do a Time machine backup (archive?) onto a separate external hard drive from the mini. Are you saying that I can't restore the entire internal hard from the time machine backup drive if it fails? If the answer is yes I can, then I don't see how this is not a backup. If the answer is no, then I completely misunderstood time machine and need to rethink my backup strategy.
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Bandit Bill
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The issue isn't cloud computing (it has strengths and weaknesses). The issue is if you put all your eggs in one basket. This principle can be applied to numerous things in life.

Not much more to say.
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Chris..S
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harryc56 wrote:
Chris..S wrote:
... It seems to me one issue people are increasingly confusing, is archive and backup. E.g. Time Machine is more an archive than a backup (although it does backup the current state of a machine). If you archive an old version of a particular file somewhere, its not backed up - at least not unless you are backing up your archive.

As a time machine user your comment has me concerned. I do a Time machine backup (archive?) onto a separate external hard drive from the mini. Are you saying that I can't restore the entire internal hard from the time machine backup drive if it fails? If the answer is yes I can, then I don't see how this is not a backup. If the answer is no, then I completely misunderstood time machine and need to rethink my backup strategy.


You can restore the current state of your internal hard disk - I say that above.

TimeMachine backs up the current state of your machine. It also archives your machine. If you need to get back a copy of a particular version of a file from last week or last month, you can. If you need to restore your disk you can.

If your TimeMachine disk goes awol, you've lost the backup and the archive. For the backup there is no problem, get another disk and start again. The archive, however, is gone for ever. If you value that archive you will want to backup the time machine disk from time to time.
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Harryc56
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok I understand. Let me ask you (sorry if this is off topic), what do people use the archived data for? I can't remember the last time I deleted a file 'by accident', so I am probably missing another valid reason for archiving data. I suppose it could also be used to offload old data from the main drive, stuff that you might want to ultimately save but it takes up too much space. I rarely have enough data to get close to maxing out my main drive. So, maybe even time machine is overkill for what I need to do.
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Smithcraft
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harryc56 wrote:
Chris..S wrote:
... It seems to me one issue people are increasingly confusing, is archive and backup. E.g. Time Machine is more an archive than a backup (although it does backup the current state of a machine). If you archive an old version of a particular file somewhere, its not backed up - at least not unless you are backing up your archive.

As a time machine user your comment has me concerned. I do a Time machine backup (archive?) onto a separate external hard drive from the mini. Are you saying that I can't restore the entire internal hard from the time machine backup drive if it fails? If the answer is yes I can, then I don't see how this is not a backup. If the answer is no, then I completely misunderstood time machine and need to rethink my backup strategy.

You are misunderstanding what he is saying. You are backing up your files, so don't worry.

SC
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dungeon92
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2012 2:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harryc56 wrote:
Ok I understand. Let me ask you (sorry if this is off topic), what do people use the archived data for? I can't remember the last time I deleted a file 'by accident', so I am probably missing another valid reason for archiving data. I suppose it could also be used to offload old data from the main drive, stuff that you might want to ultimately save but it takes up too much space. I rarely have enough data to get close to maxing out my main drive. So, maybe even time machine is overkill for what I need to do.


Archived data can be very important for business reasons, my parents ran a farm and archived data regularly, which helped them out when they hired someone to manage their finances and then money went "missing" in the sense that the farm made more profit but he pocketed the difference from the previous year's profit so it showed no increased profits. Since they were able to provide data that had been unmodified before the person was hired compared to after they were hired and saw major discrepancies they were still out a few thousand but he went to federal prison. Archives are more important for businesses when you need to keep records, especially with tax information, if is fine to keep one main file for financial information, but at the end of a fiscal year make a copy and save it never to be touched in the off chance it becomes needed for an audit or criminal case. For personal records maybe archive tax information year by year otherwise, archives are rarely useful for things like music or videos however I do archive some files to track progress on a long term project.
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ChevroletChap
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As with any type of device, there should always be a back up storage. The data's level of importance should also play a major factor. Thank you for this post as I find this a very informative one.
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