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AppleTv II different Hardware to AppleTv I ???

 
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mooks
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 4:32 am    Post subject: AppleTv II different Hardware to AppleTv I ??? Reply with quote

Hi

Well the title says it all already ....
Any of you guys know if the new version of Apple TV got any new hardware?? Or is is just Apple TV I with a new interface???

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JJJ
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 5:35 am    Post subject: Apple TV II Reply with quote

Just a guess on my part, but it might be new. Doesn't the new version allow for direct interaction with the I-Tunes server, without a computer? I'm not sure the present model can do that, but what do I know. Anyway, it sounds like the existing apple TVs will work OK with it all.

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Bufordt
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From what I understand it's a software update only.

Will know more within two weeks as my atv should update to new software by then.
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g5g5
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's basically software, packaging and marketing. Welcome to Take 2! Wink

I can't wait to see everything in action though. The new interface looks pretty cool.
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link91504
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:54 pm    Post subject: But what about Gigabit ethernet? Reply with quote

Once somebody does get their hands on one (preferably one that ships with the new software already installed) can they post about whether it has gigabit ethernet on it?

I couldn't believe this oversight by Apple when it was first released!! For those of us with CAT 5e/6 homes this would have been so helpful.
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Ben Tex
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:59 pm    Post subject: Re: But what about Gigabit ethernet? Reply with quote

link91504 wrote:
Once somebody does get their hands on one (preferably one that ships with the new software already installed) can they post about whether it has gigabit ethernet on it?

I couldn't believe this oversight by Apple when it was first released!! For those of us with CAT 5e/6 homes this would have been so helpful.


It would have been great addition, but the "new" Apple TV still appears to have 10/100BASE-T Ethernet. It clearly states this on the Apple TV specifications page.
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Pleiades
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2008 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The AppleTV (40GB) has the exact same part number (MA711LL/A) as it has always had. The "Take 2" was purely a software change, not a hardware change.
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sandor
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2008 9:39 pm    Post subject: Re: But what about Gigabit ethernet? Reply with quote

link91504 wrote:
Once somebody does get their hands on one (preferably one that ships with the new software already installed) can they post about whether it has gigabit ethernet on it?

I couldn't believe this oversight by Apple when it was first released!! For those of us with CAT 5e/6 homes this would have been so helpful.


This is kind of a moot point, as nothing the AppleTV will stream will even reach the 100 mbps limit. As long as you have a gigabit switch, that is all that matters. Today's 100bT chips can easily sustain >90 mbps.



AppleTV = 100 mbps max
Blu-ray = 40 mbps max
ATSC - 19 mbps
DVD = 9.8 mbps
iTMS HD = 5 mbps
iTMS SD = 1.5 mbps
iTMS music = .125 mbps

So if it is meant to stream/display one data stream at a time, and no current commercial video/audio rate is even 1/2 of the AppleTV's max data rate, why does *not* having 1000bT even matter?
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miniconvert
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2008 5:02 pm    Post subject: Re: But what about Gigabit ethernet? Reply with quote

sandor wrote:
link91504 wrote:
Once somebody does get their hands on one (preferably one that ships with the new software already installed) can they post about whether it has gigabit ethernet on it?

I couldn't believe this oversight by Apple when it was first released!! For those of us with CAT 5e/6 homes this would have been so helpful.


This is kind of a moot point, as nothing the AppleTV will stream will even reach the 100 mbps limit. As long as you have a gigabit switch, that is all that matters. Today's 100bT chips can easily sustain >90 mbps.


AppleTV = 100 mbps max
Blu-ray = 40 mbps max
ATSC - 19 mbps
DVD = 9.8 mbps
iTMS HD = 5 mbps
iTMS SD = 1.5 mbps
iTMS music = .125 mbps

So if it is meant to stream/display one data stream at a time, and no current commercial video/audio rate is even 1/2 of the AppleTV's max data rate, why does *not* having 1000bT even matter?


What's the point of a giggy switch if the cards are only doing 100? The switching fabric on a 10/100 switch will easily feed any 10/100 card, giggy isn't needed. You're point still stands however, giggy is not needed to stream HD content.
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Last edited by miniconvert on Wed Mar 05, 2008 10:22 am; edited 1 time in total
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sandor
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2008 7:10 pm    Post subject: Re: But what about Gigabit ethernet? Reply with quote

miniconvert wrote:
sandor wrote:
link91504 wrote:
Once somebody does get their hands on one (preferably one that ships with the new software already installed) can they post about whether it has gigabit ethernet on it?

I couldn't believe this oversight by Apple when it was first released!! For those of us with CAT 5e/6 homes this would have been so helpful.


This is kind of a moot point, as nothing the AppleTV will stream will even reach the 100 mbps limit. As long as you have a gigabit switch, that is all that matters. Today's 100bT chips can easily sustain >90 mbps.

What's the point of a giggy switch if the cards are only doing 100? The switching fabric on a 10/100 switch will easily feed any 10/100 card, giggy isn't needed. You're point still stands however, giggy is not needed to stream HD content.



AppleTV = 100 mbps max
Blu-ray = 40 mbps max
ATSC - 19 mbps
DVD = 9.8 mbps
iTMS HD = 5 mbps
iTMS SD = 1.5 mbps
iTMS music = .125 mbps

So if it is meant to stream/display one data stream at a time, and no current commercial video/audio rate is even 1/2 of the AppleTV's max data rate, why does *not* having 1000bT even matter?



mini convert -

the necessity for a 1000bT switch is when you have more than 100 mbps of concurrent traffic.

if i have 3 100bT clients on a 100bT switch, and all are maxing out their connection, they each get 1/3 of 100 mbps.

on a 1000bT switch, each of these three 100bT clients would get a full 100 mbps and i would still have 700 mbps of unused bandwidth.



think of it like a highway, 1 100 mbps client could max a 100bT network, but it would take 10 100 mbps clients to max a 1000bT network.
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miniconvert
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2008 10:32 am    Post subject: Re: But what about Gigabit ethernet? Reply with quote

sandor wrote:
miniconvert wrote:
sandor wrote:
link91504 wrote:
Once somebody does get their hands on one (preferably one that ships with the new software already installed) can they post about whether it has gigabit ethernet on it?

I couldn't believe this oversight by Apple when it was first released!! For those of us with CAT 5e/6 homes this would have been so helpful.


This is kind of a moot point, as nothing the AppleTV will stream will even reach the 100 mbps limit. As long as you have a gigabit switch, that is all that matters. Today's 100bT chips can easily sustain >90 mbps.

What's the point of a giggy switch if the cards are only doing 100? The switching fabric on a 10/100 switch will easily feed any 10/100 card, giggy isn't needed. You're point still stands however, giggy is not needed to stream HD content.



AppleTV = 100 mbps max
Blu-ray = 40 mbps max
ATSC - 19 mbps
DVD = 9.8 mbps
iTMS HD = 5 mbps
iTMS SD = 1.5 mbps
iTMS music = .125 mbps

So if it is meant to stream/display one data stream at a time, and no current commercial video/audio rate is even 1/2 of the AppleTV's max data rate, why does *not* having 1000bT even matter?



mini convert -

the necessity for a 1000bT switch is when you have more than 100 mbps of concurrent traffic.

if i have 3 100bT clients on a 100bT switch, and all are maxing out their connection, they each get 1/3 of 100 mbps.

on a 1000bT switch, each of these three 100bT clients would get a full 100 mbps and i would still have 700 mbps of unused bandwidth.



think of it like a highway, 1 100 mbps client could max a 100bT network, but it would take 10 100 mbps clients to max a 1000bT network.


No, your thinking is flawed and is based on hubs of old. Nobody buys hubs any more, everyone buys switches. With a HUB all ports shared the bandwidth, for the most part. With a switch, each port talks to the other at full wire speed. Now, it is true that cheaper switches will have a slower switching fabric but in a home environment you are unlikely to be affected by it. If you buy a gigabit switch and your clients are still using 10/100 cards you are seeing 0 benefit from the gigabit switch.

The one area the gigabit switch could help you is if your server is gigabit and you have several clients talking to it at the same time. In this case you would be correct.
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sandor
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2008 12:51 pm    Post subject: Re: But what about Gigabit ethernet? Reply with quote

miniconvert wrote:
sandor wrote:



mini convert -

the necessity for a 1000bT switch is when you have more than 100 mbps of concurrent traffic.

if i have 3 100bT clients on a 100bT switch, and all are maxing out their connection, they each get 1/3 of 100 mbps.

on a 1000bT switch, each of these three 100bT clients would get a full 100 mbps and i would still have 700 mbps of unused bandwidth.



think of it like a highway, 1 100 mbps client could max a 100bT network, but it would take 10 100 mbps clients to max a 1000bT network.


No, your thinking is flawed and is based on hubs of old. Nobody buys hubs any more, everyone buys switches. With a HUB all ports shared the bandwidth, for the most part. With a switch, each port talks to the other at full wire speed. Now, it is true that cheaper switches will have a slower switching fabric but in a home environment you are unlikely to be affected by it. If you buy a gigabit switch and your clients are still using 10/100 cards you are seeing 0 benefit from the gigabit switch.

The one area the gigabit switch could help you is if your server is gigabit and you have several clients talking to it at the same time. In this case you would be correct.


yeah, i was confused.

i was confusing myself in terms of multiple 100bT clients with 1000bT servers (my current set up at home). my apologies!
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